“Money alone does not make you happy, but it is better to cry in a taxi than in the tram.” (Marcel Reich-Ranicki). The salary is and will remain an important factor in professional life and the “Labor Market Study 2018” by the personnel service provider Robert Half asked 1,000 office workers about factors behind the raise. The results are:

  • Change of job to a new employer: 30%
  • Company-wide salary increase: 16%
  • Internal job change or promotion: 16%
  • New collective agreement and company bonus: 10%
  • Target achievement: 9%
  • Duration of employment: 8%
  • Additional tasks: 4%

The results of the study show that the majority of workers received a raise when they changed jobs. I have also examined other studies and these are almost the only and best way to get a raise. In view of the other factors, an employee also seems to have almost no influence on the salary. In particular, we cannot actively control company development, length of employment and collective bargaining agreements.

There is a salary for daily work

In general, we receive a salary for completing tasks that are defined in the employment contract and which a supervisor will specifically assign to us. Now many employees do this work in 40 hours and improve in the quality or speed of the work execution. In return, employees expect your salary to be increased. Unfortunately, this view is often wrong.

Imagine that someone mows your lawn and you pay 30 euros for it. You get the same performance over and over again: the lawn has been mowed. You actually notice whether the employee is faster or better. So are you ready to pay more money for it? It is the same when an employee does his day-to-day business better and faster.

Take on additional tasks

Look at the few factors in the list above that you can influence. 4% of employees received more wages through additional tasks. My tip is that the first step is to optimize your day-to-day business so that you have 30% of your working time free. Now is the time to find out your manager’s goals and help them look good. So take on additional tasks. It is precisely these additional projects and tasks of the supervisor that increase your salary.

Let’s take the example of lawn mowing again. In addition to the lawn, the employee now also takes on projects for you, such as caring for the roses, because he realizes that it is important to you that the roses are more beautiful than those of the neighbor. Are you ready to pay an additional tip? I guess so!

Conclusion

Salary is an important topic in the job and it has to be increased for many employees. According to studies, however, it is often hardly controllable for employees. Salaries are generally available for doing the assigned work. Doing these faster and better often does not mean more salary. One possibility is to optimize your own working hours and take on special projects from your superior. Stay tuned and actively ask about additional tasks!

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Dr. Dominic Lindner
Author

I blog about the influence of digitalization on our working world. For this purpose, I provide content from science in a practical way and show helpful tips from my everyday professional life. I am an executive in an SME and I wrote my doctoral thesis at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg at the Chair of IT Management.

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